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Can We Copy The Craft Beer Movement?

Matt Landau

Ambassador
Staff member
In my obsessive pursuit to identify parallel industries that vacation rental owners and managers can learn from, I've found myself especially intrigued with craft beer.

This is due in part to the fact that research tastes delicious. But it's also due to the last 10 years. In the face of consolidation and corporate goliaths, something strange and extraordinary has happened: the independent craft brewers have not only survived, they have thrived!

In this week's motivation, I'd like to challenge you to read this article and learn about how and why the craft beer movement WORKS. I have shared some of my favorite quotes (below) for those short on time.

I'd greatly appreciate your parallel thoughts:

Moreover, consolidation is supposed to crush innovation and destroy entrepreneurs, but breweries are multiplying, even as sales shrink for each of the four most popular beers: Bud Light, Coors Light, Miller Lite, and Budweiser.

But what explains the nature of the craft-beer boom? From several interviews with economists and beer-industry experts, I’ve gathered that there appear to be two big reasons—a straightforward cause and a more complex and interesting history. The first cause is something simple yet capricious—consumer tastes. “At the end of the day, the craft-beer movement was driven by consumer demand,” said Bart Watson, the chief economist at the Brewers Association, a trade group. “We’ve seen three main markers in the rise of craft beer—fuller flavor, greater variety, and more intense support for local businesses.” These factors are hardly unique to the beer industry.

...even as federal antitrust enforcement in the last 30 years has shifted to favor conglomerates, a groundswell has created the perfect conditions for the craft-beer revolution—or, more accurately, several distinct craft-beer revolutions.

More recently, many states have made exceptions for small craft breweries to sell beer directly to consumers in taprooms. These self-distribution laws are controversial. Technically, they create an exception to the cherished three-tier system in a way that advantages smaller breweries. But economists and beer fans alike often defend these rules, since they can help small firms establish a fanbase and then phase out when a brewer makes it big.

The craft-beer boom shows that the burgeoning of small firms stimulates both product variety and employment. Second, sometimes consumers have their own reasons to turn against monopolies—particularly in taste-driven industries—just as they are moving away from Budweiser and popular light beers toward more flavorful IPAs and stouts produced by smaller breweries.

Third, even in an economy obsessed with efficiency, sometimes it is just as wise to design for inefficiency. Alcohol regulations have long discouraged vertical consolidation, encouraged retailers to leave room for new brands, and more recently made it easier for individuals to introduce their own batch of beer to the market. Those are the aims the country should adopt at the national level, both to make it easier for small firms to grow and to make it harder for large firms to relax.

A phalanx of small businesses doesn’t automatically constitute a perfect economy. There are benefits to size. Larger companies can support greater production, and as a result they often pay the highest wages and attract the best talent. But what the U.S. economy seems to suffer from now isn't a fetish for smallness, but a complacency with enormity. The craft-beer movement is an exception to that rule. It ought to be a model for the country.

So VRMB Community members, are there additional things we can learn from the craft beer movement?

Or do we need to do a little more hands-on research 🍻?
 

StacyW

Counselor
Inner Circle
Accelerator
This is research I can get behind, lol. We have over 26 breweries in our town of 100,000 and we have some big ones... Deschutes Brewery, 10 Barrell(sold out to Anheiser bush) and Sunriver Brewing in our vacation area. Craft beer is a big deal here. It has exploded in the last 10 years and it is funny now after reading the article that they are the small guys and they have not only survived, but are thriving.

The following they have created is loyal and loves the product, which means they are willing to pay for the product. It does give me some hope that us little guys in the Vacation Rental world can do the same. We offer $20 gift cards to the brewery for our return guests and we do a beer package with our local Sunriver Brewing. They have been amazing at working with us and giving us discounts on those items. They don't have to, they are clearly doing well, but they believe in this community and want to work with us all. It is a fun community and I wish other VR manager's in my area were like this.

I feel if we all worked together we could take on the big company's in our area but no one is willing to collaborate. I am actually going to go the next town and see if there are manager's who are looking to work together and share in the joys and horrors of this business, lol.
 
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Matt Landau

Ambassador
Staff member
sold out to Anheiser bush
I've noticed several of the more popular craft brews have "sold out" to bigger companies (the most famous story of late being Employee-owned Flat Tire who voted to sell the company to an international beer conglomerate with a controversial background.)

We're seeing plenty of vacation rental companies selling too. I like most how it puts the small company in the driver's seat: based on your goals.
 

StacyW

Counselor
Inner Circle
Accelerator
In my obsessive pursuit to identify parallel industries that vacation rental owners and managers can learn from, I've found myself especially intrigued with craft beer.

This is due in part to the fact that research tastes delicious. But it's also due to the last 10 years. In the face of consolidation and corporate goliaths, something strange and extraordinary has happened: the independent craft brewers have not only survived, they have thrived!

In this week's motivation, I'd like to challenge you to read this article and learn about how and why the craft beer movement WORKS. I have shared some of my favorite quotes (below) for those short on time.

I'd greatly appreciate your parallel thoughts:



So VRMB Community members, are there additional things we can learn from the craft beer movement?

Or do we need to do a little more hands-on research 🍻?
Definite hands-on research is needed. It is a fun industry. I love IPA's and my hubby is a malt guy and can't stand IPA's. So hard for us to share a growler :)
 

StacyW

Counselor
Inner Circle
Accelerator
I've noticed several of the more popular craft brews have "sold out" to bigger companies (the most famous story of late being Employee-owned Flat Tire who voted to sell the company to an international beer conglomerate with a controversial background.)

We're seeing plenty of vacation rental companies selling too. I like most how it puts the small company in the driver's seat: based on your goals.
Yes, and 10 Barrell got a ton of money so yay for them! The beauty is these creators are now free to go do new things!
 

Jed

Accelerator
Inner Circle
Accelerator
Here are some key parallels that apply to any industry, but also apply here in the Vacation Rental Space.
  • Consumer demand creates the opportunity for small companies to innovate because the conglomerates can't be nimble like small operators.
  • As companies grow, they need to streamline operations out of necessity - economics, bandwidth, time, etc. This is usually called the "growing up" phase of a company.
  • As companies get larger, they become more 'policy' bound which makes them rigid.
  • When companies become rigid, they leave people underserved out of necessity. A little at first, but more over time.
  • Companies grow larger to leverage economy of scale, shrink their offering (products or services) to those with the highest margins and drop others, even when the others are popular. This highlights the increase in focus on the bottom line of the company and less care towards the consumers.
  • This increased focus internally on the bottom line of the company then leaves the consumers underserved.
  • Innovators come along and provide solutions for the underserved consumers.
  • And the cycle continues...
If you talk about Vacation Rental Companies instead of Breweries, I'm sure you'll be able to think of many local examples in your area. If you want me to get more specific, let me know - examples abound over the last few years alone.

Check out this graphic I made a few years ago to help homeowners understand this cycle. Dare I say it points towards a "magic zone" for VR operators?!?
 

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Barry

Counselor
Inner Circle
Thanks, @Matt Landau , for pushing us to think about such a rich topic. (And thanks for the Cliffs Notes version, by the way, since I haven't read the actual article!) For me, the key word in the phrase "craft beer movement" is the word "craft". Something made by hand. Unique. Bespoke. Something we put our full, unbridled passion into, for no better reason than that we just love doing it. The love, the passion, the doing for the sake of itself, giving each guest an experience they can't find anywhere else - these become the essential ingredients of our success in the VR business, at least for me. And I imagine that's how it is for many small craft brewers. They're in it because they just love making beer.

I was approached by a television producer from LA last week wanting to feature my cottage in an upcoming episode about vacation rentals in northern California. He said their reach is close to a half million viewers. I'm not financially independent by any stretch. I'm a single full time dad with twin 9yo boys who I have to put through college one day. I have quite sizable mortgages on my main house and my VR. This past year hit me hard as I imagine it did many of us. I was intrigued by this offer but ultimately said no, despite contrary advice from trusted friends. Instead, I trusted my gut. By April this year, I was already booked solid through November and had bookings every month into July 2022. I'm fortunate to be in this position, and I'm thankful every day - after experiencing the uncertainty that all of us faced during a year of covid - that I can make choices based first and foremost on what I feel is the right thing to do for my guests, and not exclusively on making it big financially (both together are certainly possible I believe).

Turning down this potential opportunity helped crystalize in my mind what I really love about what I do. In addition to making every single guest feel extraordinarily special in some bespoke way, I love taking care of the gardens, planting new trees (I've planted over 20 of them myself!), trimming back old growth, hand-crafting water fountains out of plumbing parts from the local hardware store to create ambiance, setting out hummingbird feeders to attract more of these spiritual messengers to parts of my property where guests can marvel at them, even spending an entire week hand painting the back deck rails and lattice by myself, every moment thinking "Oh, Cheryl and Nace are really going to love this new outdoor space when they see it!" (they're two of my favorite repeats who, in their still vigorous eighties, drive three hundred miles up the California coast twice a year to spend a couple of weeks in my cottage).

It made me ask myself, do I want crowds and scale, or do I want to savor each moment I spend on the craft? Do I want the stress of more guests than I can handle, or do I want occasional idle time to allow inspiration to come in? Most recently, after discovering that some of my guests were booking solo stays at my cottage to stream online meditation programs, I started exploring the idea of creating a "personal retreat week" offering for my guests. I'll bet that what the craft brewers do so well is not only create unique and unexpected brews, but they probably also spend time tweaking and re-tweaking recipes to continually evolve their offerings, in a way that the large scale brewers simply can't do.

How do YOU define success? Is it growing the business, selling the business for a tidy sum, or is it about how much you enjoy making the beer itself, and experiencing every moment of doing as the real success? All of these things are important, but for me, it's primarily about making the beer itself. CRAFT.
 
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Matt Landau

Ambassador
Staff member
Here are some key parallels that apply to any industry, but also apply here in the Vacation Rental Space.
  • Consumer demand creates the opportunity for small companies to innovate because the conglomerates can't be nimble like small operators.
  • As companies grow, they need to streamline operations out of necessity - economics, bandwidth, time, etc. This is usually called the "growing up" phase of a company.
  • As companies get larger, they become more 'policy' bound which makes them rigid.
  • When companies become rigid, they leave people underserved out of necessity. A little at first, but more over time.
  • Companies grow larger to leverage economy of scale, shrink their offering (products or services) to those with the highest margins and drop others, even when the others are popular. This highlights the increase in focus on the bottom line of the company and less care towards the consumers.
  • This increased focus internally on the bottom line of the company then leaves the consumers underserved.
  • Innovators come along and provide solutions for the underserved consumers.
  • And the cycle continues...
If you talk about Vacation Rental Companies instead of Breweries, I'm sure you'll be able to think of many local examples in your area. If you want me to get more specific, let me know - examples abound over the last few years alone.

Check out this graphic I made a few years ago to help homeowners understand this cycle. Dare I say it points towards a "magic zone" for VR operators?!?
Jed, your diagram has my brain spinning a million miles an hour. It gets to the heart of my million dollar question: "can a cottage industry really scale?" Here are the two scenarios I think are most viable (very good news for most IC members):

1) Big Guys/Gals: Any of the larger guys who figure out how to preserve the local experience (i.e. craft brew) while centralizing centralizable services that allow them to scale (marketing, IT, accounting, legal, HR).

2) Small Guys/Gals: Who can figure out how to scale their marketing/IT/accounting/legal/HR OR who band together and find a way to share those costs (because this is where the #1 group above will truly "compete" directly and win). On the craftsmanship, I think the small guys/gal win that game all day all night.

THIS is what we're exploring in our documentary project. Such an interesting time and place: such a blast to be on the journey together with you all!
 

AlexN

Counselor
Inner Circle
Interesting metaphor. One question would be, what is the "making beer" equivalent in our industry? Coming up with a unique flavor? Positioning it as "craft"? Gaining distribution? To stay within the metaphor, here are some value chain steps, and options.

1. I grow my own hops
2. I brew my own beer from it or put my name on it and send it to a contract brewer (PM)
3. I put my own label onto it or hire a marketing agency (PM) to market it for me
4. I sell my craft beer around the neighborhood or get Anheuser Busch (Airbnb, Vrbo, Booking) to distribute it for me (of course under my own "craft" label)

2, 3, and 4 allow me to get a property manager involved, who can contract brew my "beer", and market it for me; and distribute it for me (direct and via channels).

4. is where I decide whether I peddle my own beer, or whether a PM distributes for me, or whether I go straight to the listing platforms, or any combination thereof.

The big revolution in our industry happened many years ago: when we got distribution with the clout of Anheuser Busch, available to everyone, no matter how small, at a good price. In our industry, today 50-70% of all "craft" beer is distributed by "Anheuser Busch" and other big guys - read Vrbo, Airbnb and Booking - , and 50% is contract-brewed (read managed by a property manager). We each need to decide how much we want to do ourselves:

1. Just provide the raw ingredients
2. Brew
3. Market
4. Provide customer support
5. Distribute

My (perhaps controversial) read would be that not much has happened in the world of contract-brewers and outsourced marketers (property managers) in the last ten years; but tons has happened in the world of distribution, with the emergence of Airbnb, Vrbo and Booking Home. Perhaps even more important than the distribution that they offer, while we produce craft beer, they have spent billions to market craft brew, and have hence made our industry and product hip - so it's a great time to capitalize on that.
 
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Jed

Accelerator
Inner Circle
Accelerator
Great contributions so far!

This made me think of a thread of thought that I've been noticing in the industry lately, and it has to do with the emergence of tech tools. Like Alex said above, the marketing done by the big guys has made the public much more aware of our category (i.e. given the public a 'taste' for a more sophisticated and nuanced experience than just the standard hotel). I'd submit that is not all though. I also think that the tools being offered in our industry have made quantum leaps in sophistication in that same time period.

Can you imagine 10 years ago that a host of a single property could have access to the kinds of data, dynamic pricing and property care platforms that exist now? The barriers to entry have been lowered in a huge way. I like to think of it as the democratization of tech that drives the barriers to entry down substantially.

So, here is the next question. For all of those that seek to enter the craft industry, not just a craft for craft sake as @Barry discusses above (which I would argue could even be called "Artisan"), what is going to make the difference to long term survival for those in the craft/cottage industry? The ability of a craft minded person to couple that "taste" with good tools will create (or is creating) an explosion of solid performers in the space that couple the great tools effectively with their taste and vision. Over time though, what will be the thing that washes some away but leaves others standing? That is where I think the next big focus will need to be as the VR industry takes its next step in the evolution - and it has to do with a foundational structuring of your business for long term sustainability.

Just like craft beers proved that the consumers demanded a more varied pallet of options in beer, we are seeing proof that VR consumers (owners & travelers alike) are demanding a more varied pallet of experiences and performance than ever before. In order to make sure that this is a lasting shift and not just a fad, we need to be sure that we are still here on the other side of this wave of interest.

The current buzz surrounding the Airbnb IPO has everyone trying to identify 'undervalued' companies in an effort to find a quick score. This is something that we all need to be aware of. Venture Capital companies are out there looking to cash in on this wave of interest in our craft, but it will likely dwindle over time as fads change in the VC circles. Those who have built solid foundations will be more in control of their businesses, lives and options than those who are looking to "strike while the iron is hot" and structure their businesses around loose foundations.
 

Matt Landau

Ambassador
Staff member
some value chain steps
I love your break down @AlexN This is what I was mulling over when I put out this diagram (though I wasn't quite able to articulate it as well as you :) That if we can understand what exactly is our product, we can refine it, preserve it best.

I think our "beer" if we pull back all the layers and put a finger on the brew in a bottle -- is curating vacation homes for guests. Yes, lots of things that go into that process (and plenty of things required to sell that process). But I think that VR hospitality is our home brew.
 

SScurlock

Envoy
Inner Circle
Yellow Jersey
Or do we need to do a little more hands-on research 🍻?
Since I don't like beer, I don't need hands-on research - just give me a margarita! I had not thought of the

This was a really interesting post. New craft beer venues have opened in my town and also in a town near Georgetown with a really rundown downtown. They are super popular and bring in a lot of business. The one in the nearby town has literally started a revitalization of the downtown area! I believe we as vacation rental owners can do the same thing. We give our guests that little something extra when booking a stay, vs a bed-in-a-box on the interstate, no matter how nice the hotel - it is still a hotel! If we are doing our jobs properly, we are helping at bringing vitality to our towns - bringing in guests that want to experience things and have such a good time they want to return, and spend money in our shops and restaurants.
 
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Gabor

Counselor
Inner Circle
First ingredient: small equipment. I am old enough to remember the time when brewing equipment was not easy to acquire. It was a huge investment. However, since microbreweries started to use smaller vats and equipment (since the '80s), that was able produce small batches, a brewer's minimum run didn't have to be an enormous investment any longer. Craft beer became feasible.
Second ingredient: culture of drinking. You are not considered unsophisticated any more if you admit you love a good beer.

Vacation rental went through a comparable evolution: the financial feasibility, driven by both customer need and host need for alternative accommodation to hotel was key. The safety need and trust scaffolded by online reviews and assurances helped facilitate the transactions of private rental. The components had to e in place and the customer culture had to be ready and rest is history.

Scale? I am not sure if Vacation Rental should. You can't offer a personal touch to thousands. Example: Four Seasons Hotels landed a management contract in their early years (seventies) to manage a 1,300 room Sheraton Centre in Toronto. They worked on that deal hard for years. Finally got it. Only to get out of it desperately, in a hurry. The bad experience was an important lesson: large size was profitable but diluted the brand. They lost the meaningful differentiation that made Four Seasons special. It is not possible to offer high-touch, personalized, intuitive luxury service beyond 250 rooms. Look at their average capacity now. Scaling up did not help that brand.
 

StacyW

Counselor
Inner Circle
Accelerator
Jed, your diagram has my brain spinning a million miles an hour. It gets to the heart of my million dollar question: "can a cottage industry really scale?" Here are the two scenarios I think are most viable (very good news for most IC members):

1) Big Guys/Gals: Any of the larger guys who figure out how to preserve the local experience (i.e. craft brew) while centralizing centralizable services that allow them to scale (marketing, IT, accounting, legal, HR).

2) Small Guys/Gals: Who can figure out how to scale their marketing/IT/accounting/legal/HR OR who band together and find a way to share those costs (because this is where the #1 group above will truly "compete" directly and win). On the craftsmanship, I think the small guys/gal win that game all day all night.

THIS is what we're exploring in our documentary project. Such an interesting time and place: such a blast to be on the journey together with you all!
We currently have 80 homes, in our prime 10 years ago we had 160. Over the past three years we have fluctuated between 80-90 homes. This fall after the horrible few months of COVID that destroyed our business(then we were one of the lucky ones that exploded from summer till current) I finally bought into the idea of firing owners, yes I am late to the game, but have had parents running the business who operate from a place of fear.

I have been running the business the last few years and am set to completely take over in a year or two. This fall I was tired and decided I had had enough of certain horrible owners and we fired them, best feeling ever. We are down 7 homes since fall 3 were fired, others sold and others moved into long term.

We are bringing in more money on fewer homes than we ever have, post Covid Travel is a huge part of that, but my staff is much happier too. Going into fall I have 5 on my list that might get the boot. Long story short, I find myself in the do we want to grow back to 160 homes and be a large company or do we take 50-70 and become more niche? There are about 1800 vacation rental homes in our community and a lot of players. 6 major companies including the main Lodge. It is super competitive and hard to compete with the chains and their seemingly unending amount of cash flow.

I am liking this analogy and is making me opt for the smaller niche side of things.
 

Matt Landau

Ambassador
Staff member
If we are doing our jobs properly, we are helping at bringing vitality to our towns - bringing in guests that want to experience things and have such a good time they want to return, and spend money in our shops and restaurants.
LOVE THIS!

I'll bet that what the craft brewers do so well is not only create unique and unexpected brews, but they probably also spend time tweaking and re-tweaking recipes to continually evolve their offerings, in a way that the large scale brewers simply can't do.
LOVE THIS.

We each need to decide how much we want to do ourselves:

1. Just provide the raw ingredients
2. Brew
3. Market
4. Provide customer support
5. Distribute
LOVE THIS!
 

JPrugh

Envoy
Inner Circle
Here in Denver, the pandemic washed out the weaker craft brewers. Smaller restaurants and businesses too. The survivors have served a reckoning of their industry much like most of us.

And in a large city, there are many small craft brewers that are considered as the neighborhood brewery.

To extend the craft brewery analogy, other concepts include a craft cidery (hard ciders), meadery (liquor made from honey) as well as distilleries. A distillery in a town down the road from Lindsborg makes wild plum vodka, smoked jalapeño vodka, lingonberry vodka and bourbon.

Keep in mind that inputs are important too. Cideries can’t use just any apples, only those varieties that are ideal for cider. I suspect that there is quite a lot of collaboration in these alcohol related businesses, much like the Inner Circle.

As Airbnb lowers the bar for new hosts in a few weeks, I’m concerned that the quality of vacation rental offerings will tarnish thise of us who are working to hang on to high standards. Or will further demonstrate that quality will prevail.
 

Alessandra

Counselor
Inner Circle
I think with this craft beer discussion the "small guys" remind me of all mom and pop shops. My parents owned a pizzeria for almost 33 years and I grew up in there. Mom and pops always have a feeling of "warmth", in the sense that, you are able to give personal touches. Customers see that and you begin to build personal relationships that last many years. I have been to customer's funerals and have had the family thank me a million times for showing up. After all those years, your customers become like family.

I see that in the vacation rental industry as well. I have stayed at Airbnb's myself where the owner pops in daily to check on their clients, give information or tips on the area or just talk about life.

Any mom and pop in my opinion is better than the big boys (in my opinion) because customers/clients like the feeling of "warmth" and acknowledgment. People want the feeling of community, they want to feel comfortable and when they help out local businesses it makes they feel good. This is how trust and loyalty is built. Personally, I always try my best to buy from a local business or a small vendor online. Mom and pops always tug my heart because I know how hard they work to succeed.
 
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DMartinez

Ambassador
Inner Circle
Wing Fighter
As the Atlantic article is behind a paywall- here's an open link for those interested: http://archive.today/7suX7

To add a bit of personal context and color to the Big Brewers v the little craft/artesian guys:

In an earlier life- (1976) - in between college and getting hired as a teacher- the profession in which I had studied to become- I actually worked for 7 years as a Quality Control Technician for Anheuser Busch (AB) in their Fairfield, CA. I started just days before it opened its plant.

I was just the techie, not the taster. As a techie, it was my job to measure head-fall, beer density, make sure the yeast was fresh, the hops not moldy and no spiders or other critters were in the rice cars (yes I crawled up and into the railroad car to pluck out dead bugs).

This was also the period of time right after AB suffered a significant 13-day strike - that cause them to lose significant market share, just as the craft beer craze was beginning to begin.

As those smaller breweries started to make a name for themselves, I recall the supervisors' pooh-poohing the audacity of those kids thinking they could conceivably encroach into their world, let alone their prime shelf space!

Then one day it happened!

The QC department was all aflutter. They started including taste samples of those so-called craft beers. They began to realize there were a handful of them ready to give them a run for their money (Anchor Beer I distinctly recall) - if the word got out about them. They even checked out some local brewery clubs for fear their recipe and methods would catch on!

But they still didn't break a sweat because they STILL owned the shelf space. Plus, when it came down to the "stuff" that makes a beer good- fall of head, clarity, color, measured density they were CONSISTENTLY on top. Taste...well that might have been something else.

They also took note at the home and small vintners in the area as well. Even if the product wasn't a beer - it was a product the consumer would order/buy INSTEAD OF beer.

While concerned- they still had the shelf space and just as important- the distributor contracts.

Why the AB brewmaster and supervisors felt invincible:
Well- heck they were, after all, Anheuser Busch- and at that early time, they were still "mom and pop family-run business" loved by all with the exception of the occasional unruly Teamster who they thought was too big for his britches.

So they were the "the good guys." They knew the business- they WERE the business with a quality product - made of strict, prideful standards- and they had control of it.
>> I see them at this time as the early larger PM company- family-owned, or perhaps a real estate company that managed after-sale VRs. They know the business of the business.​
>>The early craft beer companies- then take on the persona of the individual owners beginning to presume they too can be a player.​

@JPrugh brings to our attention the craft cidery (hard ciders).

It was this very same time (1979-81) that AB tried its hand at Apple Beer🤢. The problem with that idea was the timing of it. Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) just formed. And now a behemoth company was trying to push kiddy-beer onto them. MADD placed a bull's eye on their back. The target was big enough that they were able to strike them down while the smaller "Artisians" were missed in the crossfire.

>>>Moral of that story: easier to get the big guy (HomeAway/AIRBNB?), then circle around later for the little ones (Independent owners).​

Then we fast forward to 2011 while we were in Chile- my daughter's husband decided to jump into the home brewery hobby...with an eye to grow into a business there on the side.

As with anything, it was a bright and shiny new thing- the new copper fittings imported as a Christmas present, all the tubes and measures, the smell of hops and yeast and fermentation...

Followed by the realization, after the fact, he ALSO needed a serious refrigeration system bigger than their small apartment refrigerator and AC system. So Yes...they hauled the stuff over to our home, my bathroom- which they were able to chill even further with the addition of a portable AC unit and ice. Plus end product could be stored in our larger capacity refrigerator.🤦‍♀️

That project lasted for a couple of years as he realized the fantasy of crafting his beer was hard work, required more support than he had, and caused some serious headaches with his mother-in-law!

>> So here we have the Crafter-brewer who likes the idea of the product, reads a book about it, then jumps in with both feet thinking, "What could go wrong?"- only to fail and irk those around him.​
>>Applied here- The moral of the story: Why new STR owners who want to become Limited Edition owners, need to have a substantial broad base understanding of the business, support of those around him, make sure that support is extended outward (e.g. to those who make the rules, make or break the business)...or fail.​
 

Matt Landau

Ambassador
Staff member
Tomorrow I am interviewing the President of the Brewer's Association for the Unlocked Podcast. This organization represents everything I THINK independent vacation rental professionals want in terms of 'strength in numbers.' Let me know if you have any questions you'd like me to ask.
 
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